25 May 2015

Which blinds offer the best insulation?

Window coverings aren’t just about aesthetics. With modern architecture emphasising open-plan design and natural light, as well as developments in glass technology, windows are getting bigger.

Window coverings aren’t just about aesthetics. With modern architecture emphasising open-plan design and natural light, as well as developments in glass technology, windows are getting bigger.

And large windows can result in a loss of heat in the colder months, and can let in too much heat during the warmer months. This can have an unwanted impact on the comfort levels inside your home – and on your power bills.

When choosing blinds for your home, it’s important to understand the role that style and fabric will play in helping to insulate windows and prevent heat gain and loss.

Traditional fabric blinds

Roller blinds, Roman shades, panel glides and vertical blinds have long been popular options for window coverings.

Advances in fabric technology mean these blinds have good insulating capabilities, as long as they are fitted well.

Textured fabrics, fabrics with reflective weaves, fabrics with blockout capability, and layered fabrics are all popular choices for these styles of blind. They also come in a wide variety of colours to complement just about any interior.

Honeycomb blinds

At first glance, honeycomb blinds (blinds made from cellular or honeycomb fabric) don’t seem as though they’d have a significant insulating impact. After all, the fabric is hollow.

But this hollow design is actually what gives honeycomb blinds their insulating properties. As air is a poor conductor of heat, very little heat passes through the honeycomb structure of the blind, helping maintain your home’s internal temperature.

Like traditional fabric blinds, cellular fabric blinds are available in a range of colours and opacities, from blockout types through to translucent and sheer options. Blinds made from cellular fabric are ideal for large windows and difficult to reach windows such as skylights. Honeycomb blinds are also particularly well suited to being motorised.

The high-tech design of today’s honeycomb blinds can have a significant impact on your home’s insulating properties.

Blockout, translucent or sheer?

Whether opting for fabric blinds or honeycomb blinds, your choice of opacity will also dictate the degree of insulation that your blinds provide.

Sheer and translucent fabrics diffuse and deflect harsh light, protecting your rooms from the direct rays of the sun in summer, while still allowing light to enter.

Available in many varieties for both standard and cellular blinds, sheer and translucent fabrics are lightweight and attractive, balancing light control and glare and heat reduction with excellent visibility.

Blockout fabrics offer total light control, and have an excellent insulating effect, deflecting heat in summer and trapping in warmth in winter. Blockout fabrics are ideal for rooms that receive a high degree of direct sun.

Final decisions

Chances are that you’ll opt for several different types of blinds and opacity levels, depending on where you need to block summer sun, trap winter warmth, keep rooms open to views or maintain privacy.

Honeycomb blinds, particularly blockout ones, have optimum insulation properties, while fabric blinds can be ideal for balancing the need for insulation with a more traditional look.

With the diverse range of high-tech fabrics on offer, you can choose blinds of almost any style that will not only help to insulate your home, but will look great as well.

For more information please contact us or visit our showrooms in VICQLDNSW and WA.. You will also be able to speak to our friendly representative that can help you make the best decision that will suit your home and your lifestyle.

Tags: Tips